An electric vehicle will be taken 15,000 km around Australia to test printed solar. Printed solar has been generally in development at the University of Newcastle for 27 years and could someday be integrated into the body of an electric vehicle

An electric vehicle has hit the road in Newcastle on Friday to start off a legendary expedition around Australia. The car is making use of paper-thin, printed solar panels to help power it along the way.

Stuart McBain will embark on the significant campaign, Charge Around Australia (CAA), to champion electric vehicle usage, while at the same time providing easily the most painstaking field test to date for the advanced solar cells, designed at the University of Newcastle.

The accounting professional from Liverpool in the UK has traded the cloudy cold climate of home for the shining hot outback, as he departs from Newcastle for a lap around Australia.

Inside the electric vehicle are rolls of printed solar that will be used to serve to help power the car on the 15,000-kilometre journey.

The major hurdles for printed organic photovoltaics are simply effectiveness and resilience, the Charge Around Australia project details. It points out substantial economic modelling has shown that with only moderate device efficiency as well as lifetimes, large area oriented solar tech is able to take on fossil fuel power.

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